Who knows?  Probably not though.

The Affine cipher is a specialized monoalphabetic substitution cipher.  It’s easy to use and vulnerable to decryption.

The letters (A-Z) are numbered (0-25) then treated to the algorithm:

\mbox{E}(x)=(ax+b)\mod{m},

and the ciphertext is produced.

I tried it out on K4:

OBKR
UOXOGHULBSOLIFBBWFLRVQQPRNGKSSO
TWTQSJQSSEKZZWATJKLUDIAWINFBNYP
VTTMZFPKWGDKZXTJCDIGKUHUAUEKCAR

produced:

TGLM
FTYTDSFAGBTAHOGGJOAMUXXIMEDLBBT
QJQXBWXBBZLCCJRQWLAFKHRJHEOGENI
UQQPCOILJDKLCYQWVKHDLFSFRFZLVRM

I picked a=7 (# of letters in Kryptos) and b=9 (heads of the hydra).  I didn’t actually expect this to work so it was more of an exercise in cryptology than a serious effort.  Conceivably if you wanted to brute force it, you could write a program that let you check the 12 coprimes less than 26 and then 0-25 for the b values.  That would be an extremely fast way to check but then you’d have to eyeball the results to see if anything worked.

No matter how convoluted you get however, in the end it’s still just a substitution cipher and vulnerable to analysis and guessing.

I doubt it’s this easy in fact I’d wager it’s impossible but my wager would only be $5.

Kryptosfan

Advertisements