Trying to find ways of learning weaknesses of transpositions, I stumbled upon combinatorics.

Combinatorics is a branch of pure mathematics concerning the study of discrete (and usually finite) objects. It is related to many other areas of mathematics, such as algebra, probability theory, ergodic theory and geometry, as well as to applied subjects in computer science and statistical physics. Aspects of combinatorics include “counting” the objects satisfying certain criteria (enumerative combinatorics), deciding when the criteria can be met, and constructing and analyzing objects meeting the criteria (as in combinatorial designs and matroid theory), finding “largest”, “smallest”, or “optimal” objects (extremal combinatorics and combinatorial optimization), and finding algebraic structures these objects may have (algebraic combinatorics).

Combinatorics is as much about problem solving as theory building, though it has developed powerful theoretical methods, especially since the later twentieth century. One of the oldest and most accessible parts of combinatorics is graph theory, which also has numerous natural connections to other areas. Combinatorics is used frequently in computer science to obtain estimates on the number of elements of certain sets.

A mathematician who studies combinatorics is often referred to as a combinatorialist or combinatorist.

Enumerative combinatorics is the most classical area of combinatorics, and concentrates on counting the number of certain combinatorial objects. Although counting the number of elements in a set is a rather broad mathematical problem, many of the problems that arise in applications have a relatively simple combinatorial description. Fibonacci numbers is the basic example of a problem in enumerative combinatorics. The twelvefold way provides a unified framework for counting permutations, combinations and partitions.

Analytic combinatorics concerns the enumeration of combinatorial structures using tools from complex analysis and probability theory. In contrast with enumerative combinatorics which uses explicit combinatorial formulae and generating functions to describe the results, the analytic combinatorics aims at obtaining the asymptotic formulae.

Partition theory studies various enumeration and asymptotic problems related to integer partitions, and is closely related to q-series, special functions and orthogonal polynomials. Originally a part of number theory and analysis, it is now considered a part of combinatorics or an independent field. It incorporates the bijective approach and various tools in analysis, analytic number theory, and has connections with statistical mechanics.

Graphs are basic objects in combinatorics. The questions range from counting (e.g. the number of graphs on n vertices with k edges) to structural (e.g. which graphs contain Hamiltonian cycles) to algebraic questions (e.g. given a graph G and two numbers x and y, does the Tutte polynomial TG(x,y) have a combinatorial interpretation?). It should be noted that while there are very strong connections between graph theory and combinatorics, these two are sometimes thought of as separate subjects.

Design theory is a study of combinatorial designs, which are collections of subsets with certain intersection properties. Block designs are combinatorial designs of a special type. This area is one one oldest parts of combinatorics, such as in Kirkman’s schoolgirl problem proposed in 1850. The solution of the problem is a special case of Steiner system, which play an important role in the classification of finite simple groups. The area has further connections to coding theory and geometric combinatorics.

Order theory is the study of partially ordered sets, both finite and infinite. Various examples of partial orders appear in algebra, geometry, number theory and throughout combinatorics and graph theory. Notable classes and examples of partial orders include lattices and Boolean algebras.

Matroid theory abstracts part of geometry. It studies the properties of sets (usually, finite sets) of vectors in a vector space that do not depend on the particular coefficients in a linear dependence relation. Not only the structure but also enumerative properties belong to matroid theory. Matroid theory was introduced by Hassler Whitney and studied as a part of the order theory. It is now an independent field of study with a number of connections with other parts of combinatorics.

If I understood all of this perfectly then Kryptos would probably be a little more vulnerable.

Kryptosfan