Ah, these are great, aren’t they?  They are how they sound.  You grid the text out and then rotate 90 degrees to the left or right.  What can you change?  You can change the the number of columns or the direction.  You can also do two rotations. 

Problem?

Yeah, it doesn’t change the nature of the ciphertext to match plaintext frequencies.

Plus, if it’s a viable method for solving K3 then we can’t really plan on using it for K4, not if we can believe the interviews.  I guess it’s viable if you don’t but you’d need to combine it with something else.

That’s my opnion.

OBKR
UOXOGHULBSOLIFBBWFLRVQQPRNGKSSO
TWTQSJQSSEKZZWATJKLUDIAWINFBNYP
VTTMZFPKWGDKZXTJCDIGKUHUAUEKCAR

becomes

RACK
EUAUHUKGIDCJTXZKDGWKPFZMTTVPYNB
FNIWAIDULKJTAWZZKESSQJSQTWTOSSK
GNRPQQVRLFWBBFILOSBLUHGOXOURKBO

After rotating right 90 degrees with a column width of one.  Which if I was crazy, I’d say was significant, but since I’m not then I’ll leave it as just plain old nothing.  Why is it nothing?  It’s nothing because 97 is a prime number and can’t be gridded out and manipulated with rotational transposition.  This is basically K4 backwards.  Yeah, I had to figure it out the hard way that you can’t use this method on K4…

What does “Our K-Bo” mean again?

-Kryptosfan